Guess The Airline – October 2005 answer

Every month, an airline printed advertisement, minus airline name and logo, is displayed for your guessing pleasure on Guess The Airline. The following is the answer to a previous game.

This was the first appearance for this airline, and the clues seemed somewhat obvious, especially the year of the foundation of the airline. Yet a lot of people submitted wrong answers and some were very perseverant. One last time, have a look at this advertisement from the Air Transport World issue of October 1980.

Avianca advertisement titled: 'In 1919, there was only one airline for all of the Americas', from the year 1980, featuring a Boeing 747.

How to guess it?

The airline was clearly mentioned to be existing (or more precisely, to have been founded) in 1919, and the small print said it was the second oldest in the world (still flying under that name.) Also, it flew to only six cities in Europe and appears to be a major player in South America.

I’ll be honest: at first, I couldn’t believe how senseless some answers were. There were airlines that didn’t even exist in the 20th century, and airlines that didn’t even exist, hence, the “sic” next to some of them. But then, I figure… it’s not about winning. It’s about having fun! In the statistics, I included the year of foundation of the airlines.

Statistics

Correct answers: 46% | Wrong answers: 54% | Most submitted wrong answer: Pan Am (1926) 13% | Other answers submitted: Aerolíneas Argentinas (1950), AeroPeru (1973), Air Chile (sic), Air Mexico (sic), American (1930), Boeing Air Transport (1926), Braniff International I (1928), Eastern (1926), JetStar (2004), KLM (1919), Lan Chile (1929), Qantas (1920), Trans America (year unknown), TWA (1925), United (1926), Varig (1927).

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